NASA extends science contract

Mar 19, 2007

NASA officials have approved a contract extension option with Teledyne Brown Engineering Inc. of Huntsville, Ala., for science systems development.

The contract involves development and operations support for the Science and Mission Systems Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration said the maximum value of the cost-plus-award-fee contract is $568 million.

NASA said the contract is designed to further its science goals by developing, operating and maintaining facilities and payloads on the International Space Station and other space vehicles and carriers.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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