Great lakes water levels expected to drop

Mar 19, 2007

U.S. experts warn that Lake Michigan's water levels will drop further this year.

The lake is reportedly an inch lower than it was at this time last year, and 17 inches below its long-term average, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reported.

Lake Superior and Lake Huron are also below their average levels, the newspaper said.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers does not deny that they accidentally dug a hole in the bottom of Lake Michigan and Lake Huron in the early 1960s when they dredged a shipping channel in the St. Clair River.

A new study is expected to focus on the lower water levels to determine if the problem is entirely man-made.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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