Brazier found in Iron Age temple in Iran

Mar 16, 2007

A fourth brazier has been discovered at a 3,000-year-old temple in Iran.

Archaeologists say the brazier is smaller than the previous finds at the temple at Qoli Darvish Hill in Qom, the Islamic Republic News Agency reported. They said they believe it was used to keep a fire going for the larger braziers.

All four were in a central room with a platform for making religious offerings, said Siamak Sarlak, head of the excavation team.

Qoli Darvish appears to have been a sizable city in the Iranian Iron Age 3,300 years ago. But most of the hill was destroyed by construction before it could be examined by archaeologists.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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