NXP drives energy efficiency with bipolar transistors

Mar 14, 2007

NXP, the independent semiconductor company founded by Philips, today announced the availability of its latest generation of low VCEsat transistors, which reduces power loss by 80 percent compared to general purpose transistors.

The new BISS (Breakthrough in Small Signal) transistors from NXP enable ultra-low saturation voltage – below 60 mV at 1 A – and provide high circuit efficiency, lower energy consumption, and reduce heat generation of portable battery-powered devices such as notebooks, PDAs and digital cameras. The advanced BISS bipolar transistors can also be used in industrial and automotive applications requiring low equivalent on-resistance.

“Excellence in energy savings is a major focus for ASUSTeK and a critical factor in achieving the world’s first TCO’99 certification for notebook computers,” said Jeff Cheng, deputy director, ASUS. “By working with NXP, we have access to an extensive portfolio of high-quality BISS transistors that enable us to design innovative, high-performance computers, communications and consumer electronics solutions at the best price point possible.”

With a maximum collector current of 5.8 A, the third-generation BISS transistors use mesh-emitter technology to reduce RCEsat and to enable higher current capabilities, as well as an ultra-low VCEsat parameter. The BISS transistors can be used to improve efficiency in medium-power DC/DC conversion, load switches, high side switches, motor drivers, backlight inverter applications and strobe flash units, as well as battery chargers. NXP currently has more than 120 types of BISS transistors available in high-volume production.

“Savvy consumers today expect longer standby times for portable devices and are demanding energy efficiency in all electronics devices,” said Jens Schnepel, marketing manager, NXP Semiconductors. “Our third-generation BISS transistors are a compelling, cost-effective alternative for OEMs designing medium-power devices for high-volume production.”

Source: NXP

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