Scholar: 'Jesus Tomb' Makers Mistaken

Mar 13, 2007 By MATTI FRIEDMAN, Associated Press Writer
Scholar: 'Jesus Tomb' Makers Mistaken (AP)
Limestones ossuraries --boxes to store human remains-- found in a 2,000 year-old tomb in Jerusalem 1980, that may have held the remains of Jesus of Nazareth, left,and of Mary Magdalene, right, are displayed to the media during a news conference in New York, Monday, Feb. 26, 2007. A documentary, "The Lost Tomb of Christ," argues that 10 ancient ossuaries may have contained the bones of Jesus and his family. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

(AP) -- A scholar looking into the factual basis of a popular but widely criticized documentary that claims to have located the tomb of Jesus said Tuesday that a crucial piece of evidence filmmakers used to support their claim is a mistake.



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