2005 may set record as warmest year

Dec 22, 2005

Two major meteorological organizations agree: 2005 was a very warm year, and if it didn't set a record for high temperatures, it came close to it.

The U.N. World Meteorological Organization in Geneva, Switzerland, last week reported the Earth's 2005 global mean surface temperature is estimated at 58.06 F (14.48 C) -- 0.86 degrees Fahrenheit (0.48°C) warmer than the average between 1961 and 1990, National Geographic News reported.

Official figures will be released in February, but 2005 is likely to be one of the hottest four years since record-keeping began in 1861.

The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration also expects a much warmer than average mean temperature for the United States.

Jay Lawrimore, chief of NOAA's climate monitoring branch, believes 2005 will be very close to 1998, the warmest year on record for the nation.

"In fact it's likely to only be second warmest according to the data set we are currently using as our operational version," he told National Geographic. "(But) an improved data set for global analyses currently undergoing final evaluation will likely show 2005 slightly warmer than 1998.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: NASA craft set to beam home close-ups of Pluto

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

America's place in the sun: Energy report sets goal

Dec 24, 2014

A recent energy report said that America should build on the recent growth in solar energy by setting a goal of obtaining at least 10 percent of its electricity from solar power by 2030. "Star Power: The ...

Reaching across the sea for the sake of water

Jan 09, 2015

The Arava desert, a salty wasteland dotted with tufts of scrub, gets only about an inch of rain each year. And yet cows lazily low at dairy farms that collectively produce nearly 8 million gallons of milk annually. Orange ...

Simulations aimed at safer transport of explosives

Jan 08, 2015

In 2005, a semi truck hauling 35,000 pounds of explosives through the Spanish Fork Canyon in Utah crashed and caught fire, causing a dramatic explosion that left a 30- by-70-foot crater in the highway.

Recommended for you

NASA craft set to beam home close-ups of Pluto

10 hours ago

Nine years after leaving Earth, the New Horizons spacecraft is at last drawing close to Pluto and on Sunday was expected to start shooting photographs of the dwarf planet.

Elon Musk's SpaceX drops lawsuit against Air Force

20 hours ago

A spacecraft company run by billionaire Elon Musk has dropped a lawsuit alleging the U.S. Air Force improperly awarded a contract to launch military satellites to a joint venture between Boeing and Lockheed ...

NASA spacecraft almost to Pluto: Smile for the camera!

Jan 23, 2015

It's showtime for Pluto. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has traveled 3 billion miles and is nearing the end of its nine-year journey to Pluto. Sunday, it begins photographing the mysterious, unexplored, icy ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.