Put sleeping sickness bug to sleep

Mar 09, 2007

An Israeli researcher has found a way to kill the parasite that causes sleeping sickness.

Triggering a pathway in the parasites can shut down production of a crucial molecule, killing the T. burcei parasite, Shulamit Michaeli of Bar-IIan University said in research published online in EMBO Reports.

Sleeping sickness is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, where it's estimated to affect as many as 70,000 people. It can cause skin lesions, fever, blindness and death.

Researchers said the pathway could be used to eradicate other parasites and diseases, including Chagas disease, which effects 16 million to 18 million people, EMBO Reports said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Novel therapeutic agent for Tamiflu-resistant pH1N1 influenza virus discovered

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Heartbleed bug causes major security headache (Update 3)

Apr 09, 2014

A confounding computer bug called "Heartbleed" is causing major security headaches across the Internet as websites scramble to fix the problem and Web surfers wonder whether they should change their passwords to prevent the ...

Split-second snapshots of protein development

Mar 03, 2014

The birth of a protein is one of the most fundamental aspects of life as we know it, yet, surprisingly, there is still a lot that scientists do not know about them.

Recommended for you

Saudi Arabia reports pilgrim infected with MERS

3 hours ago

In the past 24 hours, Saudi Arabia has reported four new deaths from a Middle East virus related to SARS and 36 more cases of infection, including a Turkish pilgrim in Mecca.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Autism Genome Project delivers genetic discovery

A new study from investigators with the Autism Genome Project, the world's largest research project on identifying genes associated with risk for autism, has found that the comprehensive use of copy number variant (CNV) genetic ...

Study suggests targeting B cells may help with MS

A new study suggests that targeting B cells, which are a type of white blood cell in the immune system, may be associated with reduced disease activity for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). The study is released today ...

Study links California drought to global warming

While researchers have sometimes connected weather extremes to man-made global warming, usually it is not done in real time. Now a study is asserting a link between climate change and both the intensifying California drought ...