Off-label use of stents investigated

Mar 07, 2007

A federal committee is investigating the off label use of drug-coated heart stents by U.S. doctors, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday.

The U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Government reform has asked Boston Scientific and Johnson & Johnson, makers of the stents to submit marketing materials and clinical data for review.

About 60 percent of drug-coated stents, used to open clogged arteries, are prescribed outside of U.S. Food and Drug Administration boundaries, the Journal said.

Stents are commonly given to patients who have had heart attacks, despite a lack of rigorous testing in such patients, the report said.

While doctors are allowed to prescribe stents to off-label patients, "manufacturers can't encourage off-label use," the Journal said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: FDA OKs Cubist antibiotic for serious infections

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cyclist's helmet, Volvo car to communicate for safety

12 hours ago

Volvo calls it "a wearable life-saving wearable cycling tech concept." The car maker is referring to a connected car and helmet prototype that enables two-way communication between Volvo drivers and cyclists ...

Recommended for you

FDA OKs Cubist antibiotic for serious infections

Dec 20, 2014

The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new medicine to fight complex infections in the abdomen and urinary tract, the fourth antibiotic the agency has approved since May.

Xtoro approved for swimmer's ear

Dec 18, 2014

(HealthDay)—Xtoro (finafloxacin otic suspension) eardrops have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat swimmer's ear, clinically known as acute otitis externa.

Drug interaction identified for ondansetron, tramadol

Dec 18, 2014

(HealthDay)—In the early postoperative period, ondansetron is associated with increased requirements for tramadol consumption, according to a review and meta-analysis published online Dec. 10 in Anaesthesia.

New system targets germs in donated blood plasma

Dec 17, 2014

(HealthDay)—A new system designed to eliminate germs in donated blood plasma and reduce the risk of transmitting a plasma-borne infection has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.