Scientists Try to Predict Intentions

Mar 05, 2007 By MARIA CHENG, AP Medical Writer

(AP) -- At a laboratory in Germany, volunteers slide into a donut-shaped MRI machine and perform simple tasks, such as deciding whether to add or subtract two numbers, or choosing which of two buttons to press.



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