U.S. colleges going smoke-free

Mar 02, 2007

College campuses across the United States are going smoke-free, banning cigarettes inside and out.

At least 43 colleges, mostly commuter schools and community colleges, have banned smoking, American for Non-Smokers' Rights reports. But larger schools with on-campus housing are considering joining the movement, USA Today said Friday.

"We want our institution to make a statement about doing the right things when it comes to good health," University of North Dakota President Chuck Kupchella told USA Today of his plans for the school. "Smokers still will have rights, but just not on our campus."

About 31 percent of college students smoke, compared with 25 percent of the population in general, the newspaper reported.

At the University of Iowa, Associate Provost Susan Johnson said the school is expecting a debate over a proposal to ban smoking in 2009.

"Our goal here is not to coerce individuals to give up smoking," she said. "Our goal is reduce the amount of secondhand smoke everybody is exposed to."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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