Elpida Memory Ships Samples of 2 Gigabit DDR2 SDRAM using 80 nm Process Technology

Dec 19, 2005

Elpida Memory, Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), today announced the shipment of 80 nm-based 2 Gigabit DDR2 SDRAM samples. These samples are among the first 80 nm-based devices in the world to be shipped for customer evaluation, and the devices are expected to be used first in high-density memory modules for high performance servers.

The 2 Gigabit DDR2 SDRAM devices are available in three different data rate speeds: 533 Mega bits per second (Mbps), 667 Mbps, or 800 Mbps. They are organized as either 64 M words x 4 bits x 8 banks or as 32 M words x 8 bits x 8 banks. The supply voltage (VDD) is 1.8V+/-0.1V, and the operating temperature range (Tc) is 0 to 85°C. The devices are available in 68-ball FBGA packages for easy mounting on Dual In-line Memory Modules (DIMMs).

"Inherent in the 80 nm production process technology is the fact that devices using this process will be even smaller in size, although their density is greater," said Jun Kitano, director of technical marketing for Elpida Memory (USA) Inc. "Based on market demand, Elpida intends to use the 80 nm process for its most advanced DRAM devices at its newly expanded 300 mm wafer manufacturing facility (the E300 Fab) in Hiroshima, Japan."

Source: Elpida Memory

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