Indonesian Engineers Plug Crater

Feb 27, 2007
Indonesian Engineers Plug Crater (AP)
Indonesian workers give directions to the operator of a heavy machine used to drop concrete balls to help stem a massive mudflow at a gas exploration site in Sidoarjo, East Java, Indonesia, Monday, Feb. 26, 2007. Indonesian engineers successfully dropped several large concrete balls into the erupting mud volcano on Monday to reduce the flow of the sediment that has engulfed hundreds of homes, factories and fields and left 11,000 people homeless. (AP Photo/Trisnadi)

(AP) -- Indonesian engineers successfully dropped several large concrete balls into a fissure Monday to try to stem a gushing mud eruption that has engulfed hundreds of homes and displaced 11,000 people.



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