Scholars Criticize New Jesus Documentary

Feb 26, 2007 By MARSHALL THOMPSON, Associated Press Writer
Scholars Criticize New Jesus Documentary (AP)
This undated photo made available by the Israeli Antiquities Authority Monday, Feb. 26, 2007 shows the entrance to a burial cave in southern Jerusalem. A new documentary by Oscar-winning director James Cameron which makes its debut in New York on Monday, will argue that six ancient ossuaries, small caskets used to store bones, discovered in the cave in Jerusalem in 1980 bearing names like Jesus, Mary and Joseph, belong to the Holy Family.(AP Photo/Israeli Antiquities Authority, Prof. Amos Kloner)

(AP) -- Archaeologists and clergymen in the Holy Land derided claims in a new documentary produced by the Oscar-winning director James Cameron that contradict major Christian tenets. "The Lost Tomb of Christ," which the Discovery Channel will run on March 4, argues that 10 ancient ossuaries - small caskets used to store bones - discovered in a suburb of Jerusalem in 1980 may have contained the bones of Jesus and his family, according to a press release issued by the Discovery Channel.



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