Study unclear on new wave of U.S. violence

Feb 19, 2007

A criminology expert said, despite a recent increase in the U.S. murder rate, it's not yet clear whether the nation faces a new wave of violent crime.

Carnegie Mellon University Professor Alfred Blumstein notes recent data show a 2.5-percent increase in killings and a 2.9 percent rise in robberies in 2005.

But one specific number that concerns Blumstein is the 9.7-percent rise in robberies during the first six months of 2006. He says that increase might be caused by such policies as the reduced size of urban police forces and redirection of police resources to deal with terror threats. He also cites a reduction of social service programs occurring as a result of cuts in federal funding.

"The problem is that we could have listed these same factors two to four years ago but we didn't see a major shift in crime during that time," Blumstein said. "And it's too early to tell if we will see a shift this time."

He presented his study last week in San Francisco during the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: New anthology offers comprehensive insight into the life and works of Margaret Thatcher

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Drop in US crime reveals complex role of poverty

Jun 15, 2011

A plunge in US violent crime over the last two years despite the economic downturn appears to confirm what experts have long known -- that poverty alone does not drive delinquency.

Recommended for you

James Watson's Nobel Prize to be auctioned

Nov 25, 2014

Missed the chance to bid on Francis Crick's Nobel Prize when it was auctioned off last year for $2.27 million? No worries, you'll have another chance to own a piece of science history on Dec. 4, when James D. Watson's 1962 ...

Engineers develop gift guide for parents

Nov 21, 2014

Faculty and staff in Purdue University's College of Engineering have come up with a holiday gift guide that can help engage children in engineering concepts.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.