Scientists urged to run for school boards

Feb 13, 2007

A U.S. science literacy expert says scientists must teach but they also should run -- for local school board seats.

Michigan State University Professor Jon Miller will conduct a "running clinic" at the American Association for the Advancement of Science's annual meeting that begins Thursday in San Francisco. His goal is to inspire scientists to stand for seats on their local school boards.

"Public schools are about what faculty members value," Miller said. "It's what we spend our time doing because we believe in it and we have to realize public schools don't just come to be. You have to work on it. And serving on school boards is something college and university science faculty have the skills to do, or can learn."

However, Miller said running is only the first step; serving is the second step.

"It doesn't do any good if they get in and discover they don't have the time or commitment to do the job. There is a certain amount of commitment you have to make. That's the price of doing it," he said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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