U.S. starts historic cancer genome project

Dec 14, 2005

The U.S. government is starting one of the largest genetic research projects in history: the categorization of all genes involved in cancer.

The Cancer Genome Atlas, with a total final cost of at least $1 billion, will sort all of the hundreds of genes involved in turning healthy cells into carcinomas, potentially leading to more effective treatments, The Washington Post reported.

The National Cancer Institute will contribute half the cost of the $200 million pilot project, with the National Human Genome Research Institute funding the other half, the New York Times said.

By identifying all of the genetic errors that allow carcinomas to develop, scientists hope to be able to classify every cancer and identify which drugs will work and which ones will not, the Post said.

"The future will look no more like the past than a butterfly resembles a caterpillar," NCI Director Andrew von Eschenbach told reporters, adding he sees cancer devolving soon from a killer disease to a "chronic, manageable condition."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers discover low-grade nonwoven cotton picks up 50 times own weight of oil

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Shrinking dinosaurs evolved into flying birds (w/ Video)

12 hours ago

A new study involving scientists from the University of Southampton has revealed how massive, meat-eating, ground-dwelling dinosaurs evolved into agile flying birds: they just kept shrinking and shrinking, ...

Congressional rift over environment influences public

16 hours ago

American citizens are increasingly divided over the issue of environmental protection and seem to be taking their cue primarily from Congress, finds new research led by a Michigan State University scholar.

Rural loss and ruin can be avoided

18 hours ago

An Australian Reconstruction Development Board needs to be established to help avoid more needless forcing of Australian farmers from their land, a QUT economist has said.

User comments : 0