Non-prescription pills draws controversy

Feb 05, 2007

A new plan in Britain that would allow birth control pills to be available for sale without prescription has some area doctors concerned, a report said.

Several British doctors have asked the Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Authority to consider the new plan carefully because such medication sometimes can have major side effects, the Daily Mail reported.

While the proposal does call for any pharmacist offering birth control pills over the counter to check out a customer's medical history, the doctors remain concerned about the legislation.

They said the medication can especially prove dangerous to women who are already vulnerable to blood clots.

Those doctors will be given a chance to voice their opposition to the proposal at a meeting on Tuesday with drug industry representatives, along with National Health Service and other government officials.

The Daily Mail said similar legislation was previously passed for a migraine medication and cholesterol-lowering statins.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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