Samsung Offers 8GB FB-DIMM for Servers

Dec 09, 2005
Samsung Offers 8GB FB-DIMM for Servers

Samsung Electronics today announced a new 8GB server memory offering. Following the introduction of its 8GB Registered Dual In-line Memory Module (R-DIMM) in October, Samsung has now increased the density of its Fully Buffered Dual In-line Memory Module product line-up (FB-DIMM) to include 8GBs by adopting 80 nanometer 2Gb DDR for high-speed servers. This represents a significant leap forward in advanced server memory architecture.

OEMs that use Samsung's high-density memory can increase the amount of installed memory and keep slots in reserve for future upgrades. Samsung memory such as the new 8GB FB-DIMM is ideal for space-constrained applications in blade and 1U servers.

The FB-DIMM architecture overcomes the previous limitation of two-to-four module capacity per channel. A FB-DIMM system's DRAM module content can be increased to as many as eight modules without reducing the speed. The new system can also process an increased amount of data at the same time with the advanced memory buffer (AMB) chip connecting each module in the system point to point. As a result, the server market demand for high density DRAMs is expected to increase significantly.

With Samsung's high-density memory modules, designers can take full advantage of increased memory support in the latest server operating system to maximize performance. In addition, Samsung is offering next-generation memory solutions such as the 8GB FB-DIMM to allow servers to benefit from ultimate memory density and bandwidth.

Samsung's complete product portfolio includes all variations of DRAM memory from DDR to DDR2, and R-DIMMs to FB-DIMMs with densities ranging from 512MB all the way to 8GBs.

The FB-DIMM standard has been adopted by JEDEC, providing designers a choice between R-DIMM and FB-DIMM for next generation DRAM and system design. It is designed to add an AMB chip to the existing DRAM module, enabling the DRAM within the module to communicate with the system through this AMB chip.

Market research firm, Dataquest, has forecasted that the worldwide server DRAM market will have an expected market size of 34.1B ln megabytes in 2006.

Source: Samsung Electronics

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