Study: Parents' education affects kids

Jan 29, 2007

A Canadian study finds children of parents who have not completed high school are more likely to struggle with reading and writing.

University of Alberta Professor Linda Phillips, director of the Canadian Center for Research on Literacy, and colleagues Ruth Hayden and Stephen Norris, say their study is the first to offer quantitative proof parent-child literacy interventions for families of low-educational and low-income backgrounds are effective.

"This study is unique because it attempted to look at the corresponding relationship between the mother and father's educational level and how well kids do on early screening tests," said Phillips, who led the research. "It became so definitive that, based upon parental educational levels, we could predict how the kids would do.

"What this tells us is that it is critical for students to finish high school or this vicious circle of literacy will never improve if we don't improve the education level of parents and would-be parents across the country," said Phillips.

Results of the study are reported in the book "Family Literacy Matters: A Longitudinal Parent-Child Literacy Intervention Study" published by Temeron Books Inc.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: What to do with kidneys from older deceased donors?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

We need to take responsibility for our own safety online

Mar 13, 2015

Going online without understanding the basics of how the internet works is like getting behind the wheel without knowing the road rules: you might still get where you're going, but you could be a danger to ...

Recommended for you

What to do with kidneys from older deceased donors?

Mar 26, 2015

A new study highlights the best way to use kidneys from older deceased donors, providing the most benefits to patients and addressing the worsening organ shortage. The study's findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.