Landmark health study to be made in India

Jan 24, 2007

U.S. scientists are starting a landmark genetic study to determine the linkage between lead exposure and children's intellectual development in India.

Harvard University and University of Michigan researchers are joining scientists from BioServe Biotechnologies Ltd. in Laurel, Md., in performing DNA genotyping on tissue samples collected from 750 school children, who had been exposed to lead pollutants, in the Indian city of Madras, which is also known as Chennai.

Although it's well known that high lead levels in the body can negatively affect intelligence, this will be the first study in India to measure that effect.

"This study represents a cutting edge research collaboration that will gain insights into a global environmental health problem," said Dr. Howard Hu, chairman of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of Michigan's School of Public Health and adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. Hu will serve as the project's principle investigator.

Results from the study, which might serve as a model for future investigations into the relationship of genetics with other environmental hazards and diseases, are expected in about a year.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: First genetic link discovered to difficult-to-diagnose breast cancer sub-type

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Gene removal could have implications beyond plant science

4 hours ago

(Phys.org) —For thousands of years humans have been tinkering with plant genetics, even when they didn't realize that is what they were doing, in an effort to make stronger, healthier crops that endured climates better, ...

EU must take urgent action on invasive species

1 hour ago

The EU must take urgent action to halt the spread of invasive species that are threatening native plants and animals across Europe, according to a scientist from Queen's University Belfast.

Guns aren't the only things killing cops

Apr 11, 2014

The public does not realize—in fact, police themselves may not realize—that the dangers police officers are exposed to on a daily basis are far worse than anything on "Law and Order."

Recommended for you

Refining the language for chromosomes

8 hours ago

When talking about genetic abnormalities at the DNA level that occur when chromosomes swap, delete or add parts, there is an evolving communication gap both in the science and medical worlds, leading to inconsistencies in ...

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

Apr 16, 2014

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Turning off depression in the brain

Scientists have traced vulnerability to depression-like behaviors in mice to out-of-balance electrical activity inside neurons of the brain's reward circuit and experimentally reversed it – but there's ...

Researchers discover target for treating dengue fever

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other ...

Our brains are hardwired for language

A groundbreaking study published in PLOS ONE by Prof. Iris Berent of Northeastern University and researchers at Harvard Medical School shows the brains of individual speakers are sensitive to language univer ...

Study recalculates costs of combination vaccines

One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...