New approach to science education proposed

Jan 24, 2007

A world-renowned U.S. scientist says he is plotting a revolution -- a revolution in the way children around the world are taught science.

Florida State University Professor Harold Kroto has launched an educational initiative called GEO, short for "Global Educational Outreach." Using relatively inexpensive technology, Kroto is creating his own science programs, complete with video feeds and PowerPoint presentations, and making them available via the Internet to classrooms around the world.

"I want kids to think about science and art together; I don't want to separate them," he said. "I also want all our children to be taught together. Whatever their faith, race or nationality, they must learn together -- particularly about the sciences.

"Of course, science must be used wisely, and the only way to ensure that is by good education," he added. "Ignorance allied with irrationality will surely be disastrous."

Kroto is best known for his discovery, with colleagues Richard Smalley and Robert Curl Jr., of buckminsterfullerene, a carbon molecule. The discovery opened a new branch of science known as Fullerene Chemistry and Kroto, Curl and Smalley were awarded the 1996 Nobel Prize for Chemistry.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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