The beauty of the pursuit of knowledge as seen in this 'lab on a chip'

Jan 05, 2007
The beauty of the pursuit of knowledge as seen in this 'lab on a chip'
Lab on a chip. Credit: Mathies Lab, UC Berkeley

Noting that "the pursuit of knowledge turns up its fair share of beauty," Nature magazine published a portfolio of stunning images produced by scientists during 2006. The image above, created by researchers here at UC Berkeley, was among those showcased.

The photo shows a "lab on a chip" that is designed to sequence large genomes quickly and cost-effectively. Researchers say this work ultimately could provide important medical benefits, allowing preventative and therapeutic care tailored to each patient's genome.

Nature described the image as follows: "Ditch the pipette and do your DNA sequencing at the nanolitre scale with this stylish 100-mm wafer, created by Robert Blazej and his colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley, and unveiled in May. Form follows function in a design that could easily be from an album cover or the floor of a nightclub."

The image originally was featured on the cover of the April 28, 2006 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences illustrating a paper authored by Richard A. Mathies with the UC Berkeley Department of Chemistry and the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Palani Kumaresan with the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Robert Blazej, who recently earned his Ph.D. with the Joint UCB/UCSF Bioengineering Graduate Group. Their paper was titled "Microfabricated bioprocessor for integrated nanoliter-scale Sanger DNA sequencing."

For those with an online subscription to Nature, the full gallery of images they have selected to highlight is online.

Source: UC Berkeley

Explore further: Research band at Karolinska tuck Dylan gems into papers

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Mysteries of space dust revealed

Aug 29, 2014

The first analysis of space dust collected by a special collector onboard NASA's Stardust mission and sent back to Earth for study in 2006 suggests the tiny specks open a door to studying the origins of the ...

Recommended for you

Research band at Karolinska tuck Dylan gems into papers

18 hours ago

(Phys.org) —A 17-year old bet among scientists at the Karolinska Institute has been a wager that whoever wrote the most articles with Dylan quotes before they retired would get a free lunch. Results included ...

A simulation game to help people prep for court

Sep 25, 2014

Preparing for court and appearing before a judge can be a daunting experience, particularly for people who are representing themselves because they can't afford a lawyer or simply don't know all the ropes ...

When finding 'nothing' means something

Sep 25, 2014

Scientists usually communicate their latest findings by publishing results as scientific papers in journals that are almost always accessible online (albeit often at a price), ensuring fast sharing of latest ...

User comments : 0