Parents explain keeping daughter small

Jan 03, 2007

The parents of a Seattle girl with a brain impairment are keeping her small so they can care for her, drawing criticism from some doctors and caregivers.

Critics said the treatment to keep her small violates a person's dignity, the Los Angeles Times said Wednesday. The parents said it allows her to remain at home, where she can interact with her family.

The daughter is 9 years old and has static encephalopathy. She can't walk, talk, keep her head up, roll over or sit by herself. She receives food through a tube.

The matter became public in October, when the case was published in a national pediatric journal. Responding to critics, the parents sent e-mail Monday and began visiting Internet chatrooms with a link that tells their side of the story.

Her parents, fearing she would become too big for them to lift, move or include in family outings, decided to keep her small through "growth attenuation," a treatment that has involved a hysterectomy, surgery to prevent breast growth and high doses of estrogen. The treatment should keep her height at about 4 feet 5 and her weight at about 75 pounds.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Penis transplant offers hope to victims of botched circumcisions

Related Stories

Claims about the decline of the West are 'exaggerated'

6 hours ago

A new paper by Oxford researchers argues that some countries in Western Europe, and the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand now have birth rates that are now relatively close to replacement, that the underlying trend in ...

Norway tests out 'animal rights cops'

7 hours ago

Norwegian police is creating a unit to investigate cruelty to animals, the government said Monday, arguing that those who hurt animals often harm people too.

Recommended for you

Game shows mosquito's-eye view of malaria

Apr 24, 2015

A new game about the life cycle of malaria that can be played on Android smartphones has been created by an Oxford University developer, based on malaria research at the University's Nuffield Department of ...

DMV program can generate additional organ donors

Apr 23, 2015

(HealthDay)—A brief, web-based training program for department of motor vehicles (DMV) employees that educates them about organ and tissue donation can increase the likelihood of customers registering as ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.