Samsung Samples First 50-nanometer 16Gb NAND Flash for Solid State Disks

Jan 03, 2007
Samsung Samples First 50-nanometer 16Gb NAND Flash for Solid State Disks

Samsung Electronics announced that it is now sampling its 16-gigabit (Gb) NAND flash memory with customers – the first NAND flash using 50 nanometer process technology.

The first samples of this high density NAND flash memory have a multi-level cell (MLC) design with a 4Kbyte (KB) page size to enhance both its read and write features. The new 4KB page function improves the conventional 2KB paging system for MLC NAND flash to double the read speed, while increasing write performance 150%.

By nearly doubling the overall performance of Samsung's MLC NAND, mobile consumers will enjoy faster data transfer speeds when storing or reading large data files whether they're using an external memory card, or a handset with a built-in flash solution such as Samsung's moviNAND TM.

Early market introduction of 16Gb and higher density NAND flash memories is expected to accelerate the adoption of non-volatile memory applications such as flash-based solid state disks.

Samsung plans to begin mass producing its 16Gb NAND flash memory in the first quarter of 2007.

Source: Samsung

Explore further: Kickstarter project SAM kit helps teach hardware system coding

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Toshiba launches 19nm process NAND flash memory

Apr 21, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Toshiba Corporation today announced that it has fabricated NAND flash memories with 19nm process technology, the finest level yet achieved. This latest technology advance has already been applied to 2-bit-per-cell ...

Recommended for you

Desktop device to make key gun part goes on sale in US

3 hours ago

The creator of the world's first 3D plastic handgun unveiled Wednesday his latest invention: a pre-programmed milling machine that enables anyone to easily make the core component of a semi-automatic rifle.

Twitter-funded lab to seek social media insights

3 hours ago

A new Twitter-funded research project unveiled Wednesday, with access to every tweet ever sent, will look for patterns and insights from the billions of messages sent on social media.

User comments : 0