Ancient Latrine Fuels Debate at Qumran

Jan 03, 2007
Ancient Latrine Fuels Debate at Qumran (AP)
A tourist visits the site of Qumran where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea in Israel, Friday Dec. 29, 2006. The discovery of a 2,000-year-old toilet at one of the world's most important archaeological sites is focusing renewed interest on a question that has preoccupied scholars for more than half a century: Who lived at Qumran? (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos)

(AP) -- Researchers say their discovery of a 2,000-year-old toilet at one of the world's most important archaeological sites sheds new light on whether the ancient Essene community was home to the authors of many of the Dead Sea Scrolls.



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