Toyota Creating Alcohol Detection System

Jan 03, 2007

(AP) -- Toyota Motor Corp. is developing a fail-safe system for cars that detects drunken drivers and automatically shuts the vehicle down if sensors pick up signs of excessive alcohol consumption, a news report said Wednesday.



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