Urban populations to tip scales

Jan 01, 2007

Scientists say humankind will be a predominately urban species in 25 years, with roughly 60 percent living in towns or cities, a report out of Britain says.

The Independent of London reported that official U.N. figures show that throughout the world, urban populations have more than quadrupled over the past 50 years.

London, 200 years ago, became the first city in the world since ancient Rome to reach a population of 1 million. Now, according to experts, about 200 cities boast a population far more than 1 million, the Independent said. Tokyo, known as a "metacity," has a population of 20 million.

Reports on the increase in urban populations are scheduled to be published over the next few months, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: China's reform of R&D budget management doesn't go far enough, research shows

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Biotech firm's GM mosquitoes to fight dengue in Brazil

Aug 27, 2014

It's a dry winter day in southeast Brazil, but a steamy tropical summer reigns inside the labs at Oxitec, where workers are making an unusual product: genetically modified mosquitoes to fight dengue fever.

Cities, states face off on municipal broadband

Aug 19, 2014

Wilson, N.C., determined nearly a decade ago that high-speed Internet access would be essential to the community's social and economic health in the 21st century, just as electricity, water and sewers were in the previous ...

Why now is the time to link science, ocean policy

Aug 05, 2014

Brian Helmuth, a professor of marine and environmental sciences and public policy at Northeastern, co-authored a paper published July 30 in the journal Nature Climate Change in which he and his colleagues argue for greate ...

Recommended for you

Precarious work schedules common among younger workers

10 hours ago

One wish many workers may have this Labor Day is for more control and predictability of their work schedules. A new report finds that unpredictability is widespread in many workers' schedules—one reason ...

User comments : 0