Briefs: Wireless tracking developed for containers

Dec 02, 2005

A system has been developed that allows shippers to keep track of their containers via wireless monitoring.

Helicomm and DTLabs teamed up to create the solution that feeds real-time data into client data systems, allowing logistics crews to keep a better handle on exactly where their goods are in the supply chain.

The product is aimed primarily at the booming international freight and shipping industry.

The CargoNet system is based on Helicomm's wireless modules and software written by DTLabs.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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