Samsung Begins Mass Production of Environment-friendly Hard Drives

Aug 19, 2004

Samsung Electronics has begun the mass production of a 3.5” hard disc drive (HDD) that has much less environmental impact than any other on the market today. Development of the unique component was completed last September and a limited number of units were supplied to Canon in Japan for use in a multi-purpose digital product. Now, Samsung has decided to install it in 65% of its PC lineup and will begin mass production this month.

Parts inside the new hard drive are held in place with a tin-silver-copper alloy instead of the usual tin-lead solder. No lead is used in the pain, shock-absorbing rubber or bearing lubricant, either.

The European Union has passed a resolution called RoHS (Restricting use of Hazardous Substances) that will ban the import of all electronic products containing lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium 6 (Cr 6+ ), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) or polybrominated dephenyl ethers (PBDEs) starting in July 2006. This means that PC manufacturers urgently need hard disc drives that are free of lead and other hazardous materials.

Samsung Electronics plans to supply large quantities of its new hard drive to major PC makers and expects many new orders to be received from them.

Explore further: Why your laptop battery won't kill you

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Why your laptop battery won't kill you

8 hours ago

News on Tuesday that major U.S. airlines are no longer going to ship powerful lithium-ion batteries might lead some to fret about the safety of their personal electronic devices.

Visa, MasterCard moving into mobile pay in Africa

8 hours ago

Americans may just be getting used to mobile pay, but consumers in many African countries have been paying with their phones for years. Now payment processors Visa and MasterCard want to get a slice of that market, and are ...

Phone firms and the quest for the 5G Holy Grail

10 hours ago

Lightning-quick downloads, driverless cars and remote surgery: telecom firms are racing to develop a new generation of "5G" mobile networks that could start to change the world in five years.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.