New ink makes tattoos less permanent

Dec 30, 2006

Scientists at two U.S. universities developed a solution to make tattoos less permanent -- an ink that can be removed with a single laser treatment.

Tattoo removal traditionally is painful, expensive and time-consuming, often involving several laser treatments that aren't always effective and can scar, the New York Post said Friday. An average removal session costs as much as $400.

The new development by scientists at Harvard Medical School and Duke University is to hit the market within a few months. Tattoo artists told the Post they would welcome the new ink as long as it is safe.

Some, though, said they wonder whether the ink, developed by using beads called polymer microspheres, would hold up as well as traditional inks that include heavy metals to help forestall fading.

"It might open the door for some people who are worried about the permanence but, at the same time, the permanence is kind of the point of tattooing," Mehai Bakaty, co-owner of Fineline Tattoo in New York, told the newspaper.

One-in-four U.S. adults has at least one tattoo, the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: AbbVie shares sink after $21 bn deal for Pharmacyclics

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The origins of polarized nervous systems

41 minutes ago

(Phys.org)—There is no mistaking the first action potential you ever fired. It was the one that blocked all the other sperm from stealing your egg. After that, your spikes only got more interesting. Waves ...

Supreme Court allows challenge to Colorado Internet tax law

42 minutes ago

A unanimous Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that federal courts can hear a dispute over Colorado's Internet tax law. One justice suggested it was time to reconsider the ban on state collection of sales taxes from companies outside ...

New incubator network to help clean-energy entrepreneurs

1 hour ago

The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have launched the Clean Energy Incubator Network. The program, funded by the Energy Department, aims to ...

A new level of earthquake understanding

1 hour ago

As everyone who lives in the San Francisco Bay Area knows, the Earth moves under our feet. But what about the stresses that cause earthquakes? How much is known about them? Until now, our understanding of ...

Recommended for you

US must respond to global health outbreaks, say bioethicists

Mar 05, 2015

Last summer, West Africa fell into the grip of a deadly outbreak of Ebola that has thus far taken the lives of more than 9,500 people. The fear swept up by the epidemic quickly jumped across the Atlantic and landed in the ...

Uganda on defensive over medical 'brain drain' uproar

Mar 03, 2015

Uganda's government on Tuesday hit back at mounting criticism of plans to 'export' over 200 health workers to the Caribbean, insisting it was only seeking to regulate an existing labour market and prevent abuses.

Seth Mnookin on vaccination and public health

Mar 02, 2015

Seth Mnookin, an assistant professor of science writing and associate director of MIT's Graduate Program in Science Writing, is the author of "The Panic Virus: The True Story Behind the Vaccine-Autism Controversy" ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.