Producer: teachers won't accept 'Truth'

Dec 25, 2006

U.S. teachers say they cannot show the environmental movie "An Inconvenient Truth" to their students because of a policy against endorsing projects.

Daily Variety reported Monday the National Science Teachers Association declined the offer by the film's executive producer, Laurie David, to distribute 50,000 copies of the controversial Al Gore global-warming film to its members.

David, bewildered by the refusal to accept the DVDs, wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post where she argues that that the teachers association had accepted contributions from ExxonMobil, Shell and the National Petroleum Institute, among others, where a "shameless pitch for oil dependence" was alleged.

The association denies the characterization.

Not to be detered, David will offer the film to teachers via the Web site participant.net through Jan. 18 on a first-come, first-served basis.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: When it comes to how pizza looks, cheese matters

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

When it comes to how pizza looks, cheese matters

Aug 21, 2014

Most consumers have an idea what they want their pizza slice to look like. Golden cheese with that dark toasted-cheese color scattered in distinct blistery patches across the surface with a bit of oil glistening in the valleys. ...

Freedom and responsibility of science

Aug 21, 2014

Yesterday, the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Leopoldina National Academy of Sciences presented their recommendations for "The Freedom and Responsibility of Science" in Berlin. Both research organizations appeal ...

What I learned from debating science with trolls

Aug 20, 2014

I often like to discuss science online and I'm also rather partial to topics that promote lively discussion, such as climate change, crime statistics and (perhaps surprisingly) the big bang. This inevitably ...

Activists urge EU to scrap science advisor job

Aug 19, 2014

Nine major charities urged the European Commission on Tuesday to scrap a science advisor position it says puts too much power over sensitive policy into the hands of one person.

User comments : 0