F-Secure buys out ROMmon

Nov 30, 2005

F-Secure launched Wednesday a new system to protect Internet service providers from network abuse by buying out ROMmon.

A fellow Finnish company, ROMmon specializes in monitoring Internet traffic for potential cyberspace attacks.

By acquiring ROMmon, information-technology security group F-Secure said its network control system will tackle spam and computer zombies, among other problems that are caused from cyberspace attacks.

F-Secure said that such problems cause not only bandwidth disruption, but also loss of revenue and over-burdened helpdesks.

"The only true solution to the problem is a network-level solution that monitors traffic from end-users at the network edge automatically denying offending computers access to the network," the company said in a news release.

"With their expertise on board, we believe that F-Secure can now address typical ISP headaches such as network abuse and helpdesk overload. At the same time ISPs choosing this solution will be able to increase potential revenue streams through the provision of security services to end users and defend them against zero-day threats," stated F-Secure Chief Technology Officer Ari Hypponen.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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