Forget teenagers -- seniors got game

Dec 22, 2006

Seniors should fold the cards in favor of video games to keep mentally sharp, Canadian researchers suggest.

Psychology research McMaster University in Hamilton showed senior gamers who spend at least four hours a week playing action video games display an array of skills, the Toronto Star said Thursday. Doing battle in Medal of Honor drew out skills such as improved reaction times and good spatial reasoning to a awareness of their surroundings and better short-term memory.

"Just as an elderly adult may do 15 minutes of weight training to fight osteoporosis, so could he or she play video games to keep the mind sharp," said psychology researcher Jim Karle, a graduate student in the university's department of psychology, neuroscience and behavior.

With as few as 10 hours of training, non-gamers begin to demonstrate the same mental strengths, Karle said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Smoking and schizophrenia linked by alterations in brain nicotine signals

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA HS3 instrument views two dimensions of clouds

7 hours ago

NASA's Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) instrument, flying aboard an unmanned Global Hawk aircraft in this summer's Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel, or HS3, mission, is studying the changing profile of the atmosphere ...

Recommended for you

Blood test spots adult depression

8 hours ago

(HealthDay)—A new blood test is the first objective scientific way to diagnose major depression in adults, a new study claims.

Job stress not the only cause of burnouts at work

11 hours ago

Impossible deadlines, demanding bosses, abusive colleagues, unpaid overtime—all these factors can lead to a burnout. When it comes to mental health in the workplace, we often forget to consider the influence of home life.

Web technology offers mental health support

15 hours ago

A web based application connecting people with potential mental health issues to clinical advice and support networks has been created by researchers at Aston and Warwick universities.

User comments : 0