Researchers devise safer way to dose life-saving heart drug

Dec 16, 2006

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have taken the dangerous guesswork out of dosing a lifesaving medication for congestive heart failure.

A new formula developed in the UIC College of Pharmacy will help physicians prescribe the proper amount of the powerful heart drug digoxin. The medication helps an injured or weakened heart to work efficiently, strengthening the force of the heart muscle's contractions and helping to restore a normal, steady heart rhythm.

Digoxin can be difficult to dose, and there is a small cushion between a beneficial and a deadly level of the drug, said Jerry Bauman, interim dean of the UIC College of Pharmacy. Bauman was the lead investigator of a study that was recently published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

"The therapeutic range for digoxin in heart failure has recently changed to become lower and narrower, and the new range is associated with improved mortality," Bauman said. "However, dosing methods have not been modified to reflect this change. In the study, we sought to develop a new method to determine the initial dose of digoxin in patients with heart failure."

Medical records of adult patients who had a steady state of digoxin concentration in their bloodstream were reviewed for six months. An equation was derived using the patients' blood digoxin level, digoxin dose, kidney function, and ideal body weight.

The new formula was then compared to two older methods frequently used to estimate the initial dose of digoxin, and it was found to be superior. Using the new method, investigators constructed a simple nomogram to help clinicians quickly choose the right dose.

"Because the new therapeutic window of digoxin is associated with improved outcomes, more intensive dosage refinement should be considered," Bauman said. "To this end, we offer new dosing recommendations and a nomogram for determining the initial dose of digoxin in patients with heart failure.

"This is a new way to dose an old drug."

Source: University of Illinois at Chicago

Explore further: US scientists make embryonic stem cells from adult skin

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Popular heart drug may be unsafe for some kidney patients

Jun 24, 2010

For patients with kidney disease on dialysis, the widely used heart medication digoxin may lead to an increased risk of premature death, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American So ...

Recommended for you

Leeches help save woman's ear after pit bull mauling

Apr 18, 2014

(HealthDay)—A pit bull attack in July 2013 left a 19-year-old woman with her left ear ripped from her head, leaving an open wound. After preserving the ear, the surgical team started with a reconnection ...

New pain relief targets discovered

Apr 17, 2014

Scientists have identified new pain relief targets that could be used to provide relief from chemotherapy-induced pain. BBSRC-funded researchers at King's College London made the discovery when researching ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Less-schooled whites lose longevity, study finds

Barbara Gentry slowly shifts her heavy frame out of a chair and uses a walker to move the dozen feet to a chair not far from the pool table at the Buford Senior Center. Her hair is white and a cough sometimes interrupts her ...

Low tolerance for pain? The reason may be in your genes

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.