Organic calf born in New Hampshire

Dec 15, 2006

A bouncing, 42-pound organic calf was born at the University of New Hampshire's organic research farm, university officials said.

The Jersey calf, born Dec. 12, is the first-born to mother May, a University of New Hampshire Jersey bred in Vermont. Farm officials said 46 cows are expected to give birth and begin producing organic milk within the next month.

"She's a beautiful, healthy calf, and May handled the birth like a pro," said Charles Schwab, professor of animal and nutritional science at University of New Hampshire.

The calf will be named by the highest bidder at an online auction on eBay, with proceeds funding the university's organic dairy project. Mom and daughter are reportedly resting comfortably at the farm in Lee, N.H., site of the first organic research dairy farm for a land-grand university in the United States.

University of New Hampshire farm officials said they expect to begin shipping organic milk in early January.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: New conversion process turns biomass 'waste' into lucrative chemical products (w/ Video)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

DNA sheds light on why largest lemurs disappeared

4 hours ago

Ancient DNA extracted from the bones and teeth of giant lemurs that lived thousands of years ago in Madagascar may help explain why the giant lemurs went extinct. It also explains what factors make some surviving ...

Ancient wisdom boosts sustainability of biotech cotton

Dec 15, 2014

Advocates of biotech crops and those who favor traditional farming practices such as crop diversity often seem worlds apart, but a new study shows that these two approaches can be compatible. An international ...

Collaboration yields new organic sweet corn variety

Dec 11, 2014

When the time comes for Wisconsin's organic farmers to decide which crops to plant next year, they'll have a tasty new variety of sweet corn—with a particularly sweet name—among their choices.

Fungus-growing ants selectively cultivate their crops

Dec 10, 2014

Ever since agriculture evolved ca 10.000 years ago, plants have been artificially selected to become the fast growing and highly productive varieties we know today. However, humans were not the first to see ...

Can organic crops compete with industrial agriculture?

Dec 09, 2014

A systematic overview of more than 100 studies comparing organic and conventional farming finds that the crop yields of organic agriculture are higher than previously thought. The study, conducted by researchers ...

Recommended for you

Protections blocked, but sage grouse work goes on

9 hours ago

(AP)—U.S. wildlife officials will decide next year whether a wide-ranging Western bird species needs protections even though Congress has blocked such protections from taking effect, Interior Secretary ...

Contrasting views of kin selection assessed

11 hours ago

In an article to be published in the January issue of BioScience, two philosophers tackle one of the most divisive arguments in modern biology: the value of the theory of "kin selection."

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.