Fujitsu Introduces World's First 300 GB 2.5" SATA Hard Disk Drive

Dec 13, 2006
MHX2300BT
MHX2300BT

Fujitsu Limited today announced the development of the world's first 2.5" hard disk drive that offers storage capacity of 300 gigabytes (GB) with a Serial ATA interface. The new hard disk drive "MHX2300BT" will be available in late February 2007. Featuring the highest storage capacity in the 2.5" class, it will be available on a global basis for use primarily in multifunctional mobile PCs and digital TVs.

Fujitsu began selling hard disk drives with perpendicular magnetic recording in October of this year. It has been an industrial leader in introducing high-capacity 2.5" hard disk drives, launching products with 160 GB in September 2005 and 200 GB in May 2006 that garnered high praise from many customers.

MHX2300BT marks the commercial introduction of second generation of perpendicular magnetic recording technology. The new hard disk drive will be offered in 300 GB, the highest storage capacity available in 2.5" hard disk drives, and 250 GB versions, offering the capacity needed to store terrestrial broadcasting digital TV videos. This level of capacity makes these hard disk drives suitable alternatives to the 3.5"drives typically found in desktop PCs, and their small size makes them especially well-suited to flat-panel TVs with built-in recorders.

The new hard disk drives are the RoHS compliant and have read/write power consumption requirements of just 1.6 W, among the lowest in the world, making them environmentally-friendly products. They are also exceptionally quiet, emitting just 2.1 bels of noise at idle.

Source: Fujitsu

Explore further: Intel, SGI test 3M fluids for cooling effects

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Where digital secrets go to die

Jan 30, 2014

In a 20,000-square-foot warehouse, where visitors are required to trade in a driver's license for a visitor's badge, some of the nation's secrets are torn apart, reduced to sand or demagnetized until they are forever silent.

Recommended for you

Dish Network denies wrongdoing in $2M settlement

9 hours ago

The state attorney general's office says Dish Network Corp. will reimburse Washington state customers about $2 million for what it calls a deceptive surcharge, but the satellite TV provider denies any wrongdoing.

Yahoo sees signs of growth in 'core' (Update)

9 hours ago

Yahoo reported a stronger-than-expected first-quarter profit Tuesday, results hailed by chief executive Marissa Mayer as showing growth in the Web giant's "core" business.

Intel reports lower 1Q net income, higher revenue

9 hours ago

Intel's earnings fell in the first three months of the year amid a continued slump in the worldwide PC market, but revenue grew slightly because of solid demand for tablet processors and its data center services.

Earthquake simulation tops one quadrillion flops

11 hours ago

A team of computer scientists, mathematicians and geophysicists at Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) and Ludwig-Maximillians Universitaet Muenchen (LMU) have – with the support of the Leibniz Supercomputing ...

Twitter buys data analytics partner Gnip

12 hours ago

Twitter says it has bought its data partner Gnip, which provides analysis of the more than 500 million tweets its users share each day—to advertisers, academic institutions, politicians and other customers.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Intel reports lower 1Q net income, higher revenue

Intel's earnings fell in the first three months of the year amid a continued slump in the worldwide PC market, but revenue grew slightly because of solid demand for tablet processors and its data center services.

Low Vitamin D may not be a culprit in menopause symptoms

A new study from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) shows no significant connection between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopa ...

Astronomers: 'Tilt-a-worlds' could harbor life

A fluctuating tilt in a planet's orbit does not preclude the possibility of life, according to new research by astronomers at the University of Washington, Utah's Weber State University and NASA. In fact, ...