New nanoassembly technique is created

Nov 27, 2006

U.S. chemists at Rice University say they have discovered how to assemble gold and silver nanoparticle building blocks into larger structures.

The researchers say their method relates to one of nature's oldest known chemical innovations -- the self-assembly of lipid membranes that surround every living cell.

The method makes use of the hydrophobic effect, a biochemical phenomena that all living creatures use to create membranes -- one example of a micelle, a strong bi-layer covering that is made of two sheets of lipid-based amphiphiles, or molecules that have a water-loving, hydrophilic, end, and a water-hating, hydrophobic, end.

Like two pieces of cellophane tape being brought together, the hydrophobic sides of the amphiphilic sheets stick to one another, forming the bilayered micelle.

The scientists believe the new method will allow them to create a wide variety of useful materials, including extra-potent cancer drugs and more efficient catalysts for the chemical industry.

The discovery is detailed in the Nov. 29 issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Two-dimensional semiconductor comes clean

Related Stories

New York begins effort to help startups navigate regulations

7 minutes ago

The state attorney general and New York City's chief lawyer announced a new effort Friday to help technology startups understand what regulations they'll need to follow and to help regulators understand what rules might be ...

Recommended for you

Two-dimensional semiconductor comes clean

Apr 27, 2015

In 2013 James Hone, Wang Fong-Jen Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Columbia Engineering, and colleagues at Columbia demonstrated that they could dramatically improve the performance of graphene—highly ...

A new wrinkle for cell culture

Apr 23, 2015

Using a technique that introduces tiny wrinkles into sheets of graphene, researchers from Brown University have developed new textured surfaces for culturing cells in the lab that better mimic the complex ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.