Study: Cats don't always land on four feet

Nov 22, 2006

Turkish scientists have destroyed another cherished theory by discovering cats don't always land on all four legs.

The veterinary science researchers at Uludag University in Bursa, Turkey, discovered cats, when falling, can rapidly adjust their positions in air, easily re-establishing their balance, zaman.com reported.

Professor Nilufer Aytug, chairwoman of the veterinary school's internal diseases department, told Turkey's Anadolu News Agency the felines develop those reflexes during the third or fourth week after birth and can then usually land on their feet when falling a short distance.

But she said when cats fall from about 20 feet or higher, they can suffer internal bleeding.

"Moreover," she said, "their diaphragms or livers can be torn with the impact of the fall. They can develop fractures and even sometimes receive fatal injuries."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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