Deep brain stimulation offers new hope for dystonia treatment

Nov 21, 2006

Dystonia, a group of diseases that cause a patient's muscles to involuntary contract with movement, has had a relatively limited and ineffective number of treatments in the past. New research shows that a recently developed surgical treatment, deep brain stimulation (an off switch for the brain), has provided dramatic benefits in some patients.

A new study, published in Neuromodulation, has confirmed that preliminary evidence regarding this new treatment is more effective for certain types of dystonia than other treatments used in the past. It has relieved the symptoms that sometimes force patients into painful, involuntary postures.

"We knew from early studies that a certain type dystonia has a dramatic response to surgery. What was not clear, prior to this study, was whether patients with other types of dystonia would also respond in a similar fashion," says Dr. Kathryn Holloway, head researcher. "This study shows that many forms of dystonia did respond well to the new treatment," she continued.

Source: Blackwell Publishing

Explore further: Brazil finds coffee protein with morphine effect

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Davos elites warned about catastrophic cyberattacks

5 hours ago

Attacks on power plants, telecommunications and financial systems, even turning all of Los Angeles' traffic lights green: Davos elites were warned Saturday of the terrifying possibilities of modern cyber ...

Recommended for you

Cochlear implant users can hear, feel the beat in music

1 hour ago

People who use cochlear implants for profound hearing loss do respond to certain aspects of music, contrary to common beliefs and limited scientific research, says a research team headed by an investigator at Georgetown University ...

Learning from scorpions to control impulses

2 hours ago

Scorpions can teach us a lot about the benefits of prolonging nerve impulses, and we might now be better students thanks to a study published in The Journal of General Physiology. The results could pave t ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.