New Games Use Motion-Sensitive Controls

Nov 20, 2006
New Games Use Motion-Sensitive Controls (AP)
The mechanical part of a motion-sensing chip used in the controller for Nintendo Co.'s Wii game console is shown above on top of a penny to illustrate its size, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2006, in New York. The chip, made of silicon using the same techniques used to make electronic chips, contains two spring-loaded weights and is packaged together with an electronic component into the larger assembly seen on the lower part of the coin. The chip is supplied by STMicroelectronics NV. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

(AP) -- With a tilt of your wrists, the dragon you're riding dives toward the water below. With another movement of your hands, as if pulling back on imaginary reins, the scaly beast pulls out of the dive into level flight, flapping its wings.



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