Briefs: T-Mobile runs European HSDPA call trials

Nov 17, 2005

T-Mobile has reportedly completed initial trials of HSDPA calls on its European networks and is on target for commercial launch next year.

DMAsia.com said Thursday the calls were delivered in Germany, Britain and the Netherlands over Nokia 3G technology under a partnership between the two telecom giants.

The HSDPA (high speed downlink data packet access) software upgrades ramped up download speeds four times over current rates to a theoretical maximum of 1.8 megabits per second.

Testing will continue up until commercial launch sometime in 2006.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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