Uterus transplant procedure approved

Nov 10, 2006

Doctors said their request to perform uterus transplants has been approved by a New York hospital review board.

New York surgeon Giuseppe Del Priore and his surgical team received approval from New York's Downtown Hospital board, NewScientist.com said.

The transplant team said it is interviewing potential candidates. The team said women who undergo the transplant would be given a healthy uterus from a donor who died.

Del Priore and researchers at the University of Pittsburgh performed the first successful uterus transplant in a monkey.

Del Priore said he plans to track a pregnancy in a monkey that has undergone a transplant, but he said he thought enough study has been done to consider the procedure safe for women, NewScientist.com said. If a uterus transplant were carried out, it would only be the second in the world; the first, in Saudi Arabia in 2000, failed.

One researcher in Sweden said performing the transplant before more non-human primate study is done would put the recipient at risk, while a British doctor said he was two years away from performing a uterus transplant on a woman, NewScientist.com said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: World's first wearable blue LED light therapy device to treat skin disease psoriasis vulgaris

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

What's PayPal's first solo move?

7 hours ago

PayPal's impending split from long-time partner eBay Inc. will ratchet up its appeal to online retail competitors such as Amazon.com and give it the freedom to aggressively take on new mobile pay challeng ...

US-India to collaborate on Mars exploration

7 hours ago

The United States and India, fresh from sending their own respective spacecraft into Mars' orbit earlier this month, on Tuesday agreed to cooperate on future exploration of the Red Planet.

Recommended for you

Motion capture examines dance techniques

Sep 29, 2014

WAAPA dance students are set to take part in a world-first biomechanical study that tracks their training, technique and injuries as they develop as professional performers.

User comments : 0