Government awards hydrogen engine contract

Nov 09, 2006

The U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a contract to Michigan's Energy Conversion Devices Inc. to develop small hydrogen internal combustion engines.

The estimated total cost of the Department of Energy project is approximately $1.7 million, with the department providing $1.2 million.

Under the contract, the Rochester Hills, Mich., company will develop a low-cost method to convert small gasoline internal combustion engines to run on hydrogen fuel while maintaining the performance and durability of unmodified engines.

"This is a great opportunity for us to advance the work done to date on hydrogen-ICE fueled scooters and three-wheeled taxis ...," said ECD President Stanford Ovshinsky.

He said there is a significant potential market for reliable, low-cost engines with near zero emissions in stationary and mobile applications that include two- and three-wheeled vehicles, lawn and garden care equipment and small back-up generator sets.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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