Los Angeles eyes action against hospitals

Nov 08, 2006

The Los Angeles city attorney's office has begun plans to file legal action against 10 hospitals suspected of abandoning discharged patients on skid row.

Sources close to the case said the city attorney's office aims to stop the practice of dumping homeless patients in the neighborhood against their will, The Los Angeles Times reported Wednesday.

The city attorney and a hospital trade group had previously attempted to resolve the matter during talks that ended in April. Hospitals considered the regulations sought by City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo to be too stringent and objected to the city's proposal to involve the American Civil Liberties Union in monitoring the agreement.

The city attorney's office is preparing for civil litigation backed by the ACLU and pro bono law office Public Counsel against the hospitals for unfair business practices. Sources said the city may also bring criminal charges in the case.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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