Siemens debuts the world’s smallest EDGE base station

Nov 15, 2005

With the new nanoEDGE base stations from Siemens Communications, it is now possible for the first time to provide full wireless coverage with EDGE technology even in what used to be shadowed areas inside buildings, for example, such as in basements or underground parking garages. These compact base stations offer any number of advantages: In addition to being easy to install, they can also be configured, operated, maintained and powered from the IP network.

EDGE (Enhanced Data Rates for GSM Evolution) technology offers high data rates of up to 384 kbit per second in GSM networks. In the years to come, EDGE technology will continue to play a major role, in addition to W-CDMA. Because thanks to EDGE, mobile providers who do not possess a W-CDMA license can nevertheless offer their customers fast mobile data connections.

“EDGE enables our customers to further broaden their data-intensive services and generate new revenues through higher data traffic,” said Christoph Caselitz, the President of the Mobile Networks Division at Siemens Communications. The demand is strong: There are already more than 150 end-user devices for EDGE on the market today.

Siemens Communications has equipped the mobile communication networks of over 20 customers worldwide with EDGE technology, including networks in Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam in Asia and in Italy or the Czech Republic in Europe.

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