Briefs: Nokia, T-Mobile develop high-speed network

Nov 15, 2005

Nokia said Monday it has completed high-speed downlink data packet access calls together with Germany's T-Mobile.

The Finnish telecommunications group said its third-generation phone technology has allowed the two companies to make HSDPA calls in Britain, Germany and the Netherlands.

"The HSDPA calls demonstrate T-Mobile's commitment to raising the bar for the quality of broadband mobile data services," Hamid Akhavan, chief technology officer of T-Mobile, said in a news release. "The calls are a good example of the successful cooperation that is taking place between T-Mobile and Nokia in the field of high speed mobile access and broadband applications."

HSDPA allows users to download even faster on their mobile handsets.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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