ISS crew begins robotics proficiency work

Nov 03, 2006

The International Space Station's Expedition 14 Cmdr. Michael Lopez-Alegria has started several days of robotics proficiency work.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration controllers in Houston say the projects include movement of the station's robotic arm, Canadarm2, from one location to another. Lopez-Alegria also practiced modified grapple and release procedures with the equipment.

The commander also Wednesday performed a scheduled lens change on the EarthKAM, going from 50mm to the 180mm lens configuration. The camera takes pictures by remote operation from the ground by students who submit image requests to conduct geographic research.

Flight engineer Mikhail Tyurin on Thursday was to prepare some of the equipment he will use to hit golf balls outside the Pirs Docking Compartment for a commercial endeavor during a Nov. 22 Russian spacewalk.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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