Second dengue fever patient dies in Taiwan

Nov 01, 2006

Taiwanese officials say dengue fever has claimed its second life this year in the southern city of Kaohsiung.

Taiwan's Center for Disease Control Deputy Chief Chou Chih-hau said Wednesday more than 500 confirmed cases of dengue fever have been reported on the island since the start of summer, with seven people remaining hospitalized, The China Post reported.

A 76-year-old man who had a history of diabetes, high blood pressure and heart ailments died of dengue fever. He was hospitalized Oct. 18 and confirmed as a dengue fever victim Oct. 28.

The other dengue fever fatality, an elderly woman, also lived in Kaohsiung, which was the area hit hardest by a 2002 dengue fever outbreak, the newspaper said.

Dengue fever symptoms include high fever, rash, severe headache, pain behind the eyes, muscle and joint pain, accompanied by nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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