Army Monitors Soldiers' Blogs, Web Sites

Oct 30, 2006
Army Monitors Soldiers' Blogs, Web Sites (AP)
Author Matthew Currier Burden stands at the Pritzker Military Library with a copy of his book containing a collection of entries from bloggers who served in the war called , "The Blog Of War," in Chicago, Ill., in this Oct. 26, 2006 file photo. From the front lines of Iraq and Afghanistan to here at home, soldiers blogging about military life are under the watchful eye of some of their own. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

(AP) -- From the front lines of Iraq and Afghanistan to here at home, soldiers blogging about military life are under the watchful eye of some of their own.



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