NASA Invention of the Year winner named

Oct 26, 2006

A groundwater treatment technology developed at the Kennedy Space Center has been named NASA's 2005 Government Invention of the Year.

The Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron, or EZVI, technology -- also named NASA 2005 Commercial Invention of the Year -- was developed by NASA researchers from Kennedy and the University of Central Florida.

The technology is used to remove environmental contaminants from ground water around industrial areas, such as rocket launch pads, and also provides a means to clean Superfund sites.

The process can reportedly limit both the time and costs associated with traditional methods used to clean areas contaminated with groundwater pollutants.

NASA said it has signed six non-exclusive licenses with companies to market and further develop EZVI.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: NASA sees developing Tropical Storm Halong causing warning

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Physicists discuss quantum pigeonhole principle

11 hours ago

The pigeonhole principle: "If you put three pigeons in two pigeonholes at least two of the pigeons end up in the same hole." So where's the argument? Physicists say there is an important argument. While the ...

Giant crater in Russia's far north sparks mystery

13 hours ago

A vast crater discovered in a remote region of Siberia known to locals as "the end of the world" is causing a sensation in Russia, with a group of scientists being sent to investigate.

NASA Mars spacecraft prepare for close comet flyby

14 hours ago

NASA is taking steps to protect its Mars orbiters, while preserving opportunities to gather valuable scientific data, as Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring heads toward a close flyby of Mars on Oct. 19.

Recommended for you

Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean

11 hours ago

As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water which is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle ...

New research reveals Pele is powerful, even in the sky

17 hours ago

One might assume that a tropical storm moving through volcanic smog (vog) would sweep up the tainted air and march on, unchanged. However, a recent study from atmospheric scientists at the University of Hawai'i ...

Image: Wildfires continue near Yellowknife, Canada

17 hours ago

The wildfires that have been plaguing the Northern Territories in Canada and have sent smoke drifting down to the Great Lakes in the U.S. continue on. NASA's Aqua satellite collected this natural-color image ...

User comments : 0